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[GUIA] Escolha certa de grafica para portatil

Discussão em 'Dúvidas e Suporte Técnico Portáteis' iniciada por f4ri4, 7 de Dezembro de 2007. (Respostas: 1; Visualizações: 917)

  1. f4ri4

    f4ri4 Power Member

    bem tenho visto muita gente com duvidas sobre as graficas que comprar com o portatil, porque ou se são boas para isto, são boas para aquilo qual é a melhor, qual a pior por ai fora. entranto vou tentar ajudar o pessoal ao por aqui uma especie de guia para dissipar as duvidas de uma vez por todas. o guia está em ingles. mas é do mais completo que já vi. está muito bom mesmo.

    aqui vai.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "The Mobile Graphics Card Info Page
    By: Chaz

    The purpose of this page is to show you how well different GPUs perform in modern games, as well as where they place in terms of performance in comparison to others. I also have explanations for each different class of video card.

    Before you read...
    Quote:--Click Here for an easy way to find out if your GPU will run a certain game:
    http://www.systemrequirementslab.com/referrer/srtest

    --YOU CANNOT UPGRADE YOUR GRAPHICS CARD!
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/showthread.php?t=41454

    --Benchmarks for almost ALL mobile video cards can be found here.

    --A detailed explanation on how games are "rendered" - great read!

    --I will update this chart with DirectX 10 graphics cards after I have a sufficient number of synthetic and game benchmarks for each of them.

    Now on with the guide.
    Index:
    -Use the Find function in your browser and type in the code (with the colons) to be taken directly to that section.

    1.Video Card comparison :GHIJUZ:
    A.Integrated Cards :HTRBJL:
    B.Low-End Cards :FDOPIT:
    C.Mid-Range Cards :HVROLE:
    D.Performance Cards :HFBVCL:
    E.High-End Cards :KWAXGD:
    2. What kind of GPU do I need? :JRWXKL:

    3. Information about video memory :TBVCDI:
    A.Shared Memory Technologies :HDXPRL:
    4. FAQ's :KIESLG:


    Section 1 :GHIJUZ:

    A.Integrated Graphics Processors :HTRBJL:

    What are Integrated Graphics Processors (IGPs)? They are a simple graphics controller located on the motherboard. IGPs (with few exceptions) do not have their own memory and cannot play complex 3D games. Integrated graphics cards are not for gaming – office work, DVD watching, and web surfing is near the limit of their capabilities. They can be found in almost any size notebook, from those with a 10.6” screen to 17”. Advantages of an IGP include low power consumption and virtually no heat.

    Although IGP performance is for the most part irrelevant, they are rated below from lowest-performing to highest:
    Quote:Intel GMA900
    Intel GMA950*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 200M*
    Nvidia GeForce Go6100/6150*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 1100/1150*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 1200/1250*
    Intel GMA X3100*

    *Denotes card is capable of running Vista Aero

    The Intel GMA X3100 is now present in this chart; it has turned out to be a very impressive performer thanks to its hardware capabilities. Intel typically always had the poorest performing GPUs but that has changed with the introduction of the X3100. When improved drivers come out for it, its performance should get even better.

    The GeForce Go6150 and Radeon X200M are very similar in performance, while the X1150 improves on them by about 30% in terms of overall performance.
    IGPs have no memory of their own – they borrow it from the main system memory. Some IGPs, such as the Radeon X200M/X1150 can have some dedicated memory (64-128MB max.), but that is not common.

    B.Low-end Video Cards :FDOPIT:

    Even if you are a non-gamer, it is probably in your best interest to get a notebook that has a low-end video card. The reasoning behind this is because:
    A. They have their own dedicated memory to use, and will not share with your main system RAM as a standard integrated card will.
    B. Low-end video cards have technologies that smooth out video playback and DVDs.

    Low-end video cards can be found in notebooks ranging from 12” to 17”. If you are looking for an ultraportable (12” and less), then you probably won't get a dedicated card. It is not a huge deal if you don't have a dedicated card, it is simply a nice feature to have.

    From lowest to highest performance:
    Quote:Nvidia GeForce Go6200
    ATI Mobility Radeon X300
    Nvidia GeForce Go7200
    Nvidia GeForce Go7300
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1300
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1350
    ATI Mobility Radeon X2300

    Newer notebooks with dual-core processors will have the Radeon X1300 and GeForce Go7300; the X300 and Go6200 are previous-generation parts and were replaced by them. The odd card here is the MR X2300 - it's actually an X1300 with faster clocks. The naming is odd but just know the card itself is nothing special.

    C.Mid-range Video Cards :HVROLE:

    Mid-range video cards have enough power to play the latest games at comfortable and enjoyable settings. You won't be able to push the settings to maximum, but overall are well-rounded cards. They do not produce a lot of heat nor require a lot of power, and can be found in notebooks from 12” to 17”.

    From lowest to highest performance:

    Quote:Nvidia GeForce Go6400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X600
    Nvidia GeForce Go7400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1450
    Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GS

    The newest card here is the Nvidia 8400M-GS. It is DirectX 10 compliant and has a 64-bit memory bus.

    The Radeon X1450 is a die shrink of the X1400 and does not offer any additional performance increases. It only consumes slightly less power and produces less heat than the regular X1400 as a result of the die shrink.

    D.Performance Video Cards :HFBVCL:

    Now we're talking. Hardcore gamers and those looking for the best visual experience in a 15.4” or smaller notebook should target these cards. They can be found in anything from a 14” to a 17” notebook, and have ample power to play the latest games at the highest settings or close to it. Power consumption is higher than that of the mid-range cards, but still balanced. It is not hard to find a notebook with one of these cards that still has good (2.5+ hours) battery life.

    From lowest to highest performance:

    Quote:Nvidia GeForce Go6600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X700
    Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GT
    Nvidia GeForce Go7600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1700
    ATI Mobility Radeon X2500
    Nvidia GeForce Go7700
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GS
    Nvidia GeForce Go7600GT
    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 2600 DDR2
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT DDR2
    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 2600 GDDR3
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT GDDR3
    Nvidia GeForce 8700M-GT

    The Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GT, 8600M-GS 8600M-GT, and 8700M-GT are the newest additions to this chart. The 8600M-GT is significantly faster than the 8600M-GS - the main difference between them is that the -GT has double the stream processors. See benchmarks for these cards here. Both of these cards are DirectX 10 compliant. The Nvidia 8400M-GT is in a different class than the 8400M-GS because it has a 128-bit memory bus. It is a fast card, just under the Go7600/X1600.
    I have classified the 8700M-GT as a performance card because it has a 128-bit memory bus. A true high-end card has a 256-bit bus. Even though it outperforms high-end cards like the Go7900GS in synthetic 3DMark05 benchmarks, it will most likely fall behind it in high-resolution gaming performance.

    For a comparison between the Go7600 and X1600, see this thread.
    The ATI Radeon X1700 and GeForce Go7700 are only found in a select few notebooks at the moment. The X1700 offers near-identical performance to the X1600; read more about it here. The X2500 is the same card as the X1700 except it has a different name - ATI obviously did it for marketing reasons. Don't be fooled. The GeForce Go7700 is without a doubt faster than the X1700, although not by a huge amount.


    E.High-end Video Cards :KWAXGD:

    If you are looking for the best possible 3D performance in a notebook, the below cards are the fastest out there. You won't find them in anything short of a 17” notebook. They have considerable power requirements and produce equally high amounts of heat, hence the 17” size notebook is needed to house a cooling system for them. High-end video cards can handle all the latest games at high resolutions and maximum settings.

    From lowest to highest performance:

    Quote:Nvidia GeForce Go7800
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1800
    Nvidia GeForce Go7900GS
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1900
    Nvidia GeForce Go7800GTX
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1800XT
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT SLI
    Nvidia GeForce Go7900GTX
    Nvidia GeForce Go7950GTX
    Nvidia GeForce 8700M-GT SLI
    Nvidia GeForce Go7950GTX SLI
    Nvidia GeForce 8800M-GTX
    Nvidia GeForce 8800M-GTX SLI

    The single fastest card here is the just-released GeForce 8800M-GTX. I will add the 8800M-GTS when there are benchmarks for it. It could very well surpass the performance of the 8700M-GT SLI given its specifications.
    I have the SLI configurations for even the 8600M-GT and the 8700M-GT added in here because while a single card is not considered a high-end configuration, two of them together certainly is.

    THE BIG CHART
    This chart ranks every current notebook GPU's performance from least at the top to greatest at the bottom.
    Quote:Intel GMA900
    Intel GMA950*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 200M*
    Nvidia GeForce Go6100/6150*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 1100/1150*
    ATI Radeon Xpress 1200/1250*
    Intel GMA X3100
    Nvidia GeForce Go6200
    ATI Mobility Radeon X300
    Nvidia GeForce Go7200
    Nvidia GeForce Go6400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X600
    Nvidia GeForce Go7300
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1300
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1350
    ATI Mobility Radeon X2300
    Nvidia GeForce Go7400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1400
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1450
    Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GS
    Nvidia GeForce Go6600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X700
    Nvidia GeForce Go7600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1600
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1700
    Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GT
    Nvidia GeForce Go7700
    Nvidia GeForce Go7600GT
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GS
    Nvidia GeForce Go7800
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1800
    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 2600 DDR2
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT DDR2
    ATI Mobility Radeon HD 2600 GDDR3
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT GDDR3
    Nvidia GeForce Go7900GS
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1900
    Nvidia GeForce Go7800GTX
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1800XT
    Nvidia GeForce 8700M-GT
    Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT SLI
    Nvidia GeForce Go7900GTX
    Nvidia GeForce Go7950GTX
    Nvidia GeForce 8700M-GT SLI
    Nvidia GeForce Go7950GTX SLI
    Nvidia GeForce 8800M-GTX
    Nvidia GeForce 8800M-GTX SLI


    Section 2: What kind of video card do I need?:JRWXKL:

    If.....
    Quote:-You don't play games
    -You want the best battery life
    -Portability is very important

    ....Then you are looking for a notebook with integrated graphics.

    If.....
    Quote:-You don't require the best visual graphics, but just want to play occasional games

    ....Then a low-end video card should serve you well. Mid-range will also do, but not entirely necessary.

    If.....
    Quote:-Your gaming needs are moderate, you want to balance visual quality and don't want to spend a lot

    ....Then a mid-range card would suit you best.

    If....
    Quote:-You are a frequent gamer and want to enjoy a game at higher settings
    -You want to retain some portability and battery life

    .....Then a performance-class video card is what to shoot for.

    If....
    Quote:-You want to play the latest games on the highest settings
    -Portability and battery life aren't of the highest priorities

    ....Then you're looking at a high-end card and a 17”+ notebook.

    Section 3: Information About Video Memory:TBVCDI:

    “How much video memory do you need?” is a common question these days. Answer – 128MB to be able to comfortably handle the latest games. 64MB doesn't cut it, although there are exceptions if the card uses the shared video technologies such as HyperMemory (ATI) and TurboCache (Nvidia) – more on that later.

    Most gamers should not have any problems playing games on a 128MB card. Hardcore gamers should aim for the 256MB chips; they are much better performers at higher resolutions and settings.

    A.Shared Video Memory Technologies :HDXPRL:

    Shared video memory is memory the video card borrows from the main system RAM. Shared memory is in no way a substitute for real dedicated memory. It usually does not provide much of, if any, performance gain.
    HyperMemory is ATI's version of shared memory. Usually, if a card is advertised as, for example, “256MB ATI Mobility Radeon X1400 HyperMemory”, the video memory is double what it actually has. So the X1400 in this example would actually have 128MB dedicated, and the other 128MB shared from the main system memory.

    Nvidia's technology, TurboCache, is more difficult to figure out. For example, a “256MB Nvidia GeForce Go7400 TurboCache” could be half dedicated and half shared as in the ATI example above, but also could be one quarter dedicated and three quarters shared (64MB + 192MB). Of the two technologies, Nvidia's is superior, as part of it is done in hardware; ATI's solution relies completely on software and is considerably slower.

    Always find out how much dedicated video memory a card has before buying to be safe. The shared memory technologies are really confusing, and frankly, it is ripping off the consumer, tricking them into thinking that a video card is better than it is.

    Section 4: The FAQ :KIESLG:
    Quote:1.Is an ATI Radon X1400 256MB better than an ATI Radeon X700 128MB?

    This is a very common train of thought – more video memory must mean better performance. This is not true – the video card itself matters much more than the memory it has.
    In this case, the X700 is the faster card, even though it has half the video memory. The reason for this is fairly simple – the X1400, although it has 256MB of memory, cannot use all of it effectively.
    Here's a primitive example. An office worker can use a maximum of three computers at a time. If he is given an additional three computers, is he any more productive? No, because he can only use three of them to begin with. The extra three do nothing.
    Quote:2.How much RAM do I need to play the latest games?

    The minimum needed today to play modern games without issues is 1GB. Most games will run fine with that amount of memory. If possible, it is best to go to 2GB for the ultra-modern games (such as FEAR, Oblivion, etc).
    If you are using Windows Vista, 2GB is the minimum.
    Quote:3.My game keeps crashing and getting odd errors and glitches, is there anything I can do?

    There are several:
    -Do a Windows Update manually: Start, All Programs, Windows Update. Do a “Custom” scan when it pops up and see what sort of updates are available for your system, mainly under hardware.
    -Check for updates and patches for the games; Google/Live search is a great place to start.
    -Update your video drivers
    Quote:4.I am experiencing very poor gaming performance, even though my computer should easily be able to play the game.

    Try this:
    -Start, Right-click My Computer, Properties, Advanced tab, under “Performance” hit Settings, Advanced tab. Now under “Virtual Memory”, change it to 1.5 or 2GB. Restart for change to take effect.
    -Update your video drivers
    -Make sure Vsync is off, both in-game and on your video card as well;
    -Right-click Destkop, Properties, Settings, Advanced, and look for the option to toggle it on and off. The location varies, so I cannot give an exact location.
    -Make sure Anti-Aliasing and Antistrophic filtering are off both in game and on your video card, see above bullet.
    Quote:5.Will a fast processor make up for a slower GPU?

    No, it will not. The GPU is the bottleneck in most cases. If the video card is slow, the game will also run poorly because of it. The CPU can only do so much. For example, if the CPU finishes 50 frames and sends them to the GPU, but the GPU can only render 22 of them, then it wouldn't matter if you had a CPU that could finish 100 frames - the GPU can still only do 22. This is the case with most computers.
    Quote:6. What are the best video cards available in a 12-13.3", 14", 15.4", and 17" notebook?

    Listed below are the best cards that can be found in different sized notebooks (all memory sizes listed are dedicated memory, not including shared via TurboCache/HyperMemory):
    17"
    -Nvidia GeForce Go7950GTX (512MB)
    -ATI Mobility Radeon X1900 (256MB)

    14" & 15.4"
    -Nvidia GeForce 8600M-GT
    -ATI Mobility Radeon HD 2600

    13.3"
    -Nvidia GeForce 8400M-GS*

    12"
    -Nvidia GeForce Go7400 (64MB)*

    *There is virtually no performance difference between the 64MB and 128MB versions of the Go7400; TurboCache shared memory compensates for the relatively small amount of video memory on the 64MB version quite well.

    Quote:7. How do I measure my FPS (Frames Per Second) in games?

    There is a utility you can download which will display the frames per second in games - FRAPS:
    http://www.fraps.com/
    Download & Install, then minimize it and it will reside in the System Tray. The framerate counter will appear in one of the corners of your screen when a 3D application is opened up.
    The ideal framerate is 30FPS and over; if you are not getting 30, then adjust settings until you do.
    Quote:8. Will a faster hard drive help my gaming performance?

    The hard drive does not affect in-game performance; a faster hard drive will only decrease loading times. A faster hard drive is a great upgrade for increasing overall performance (basically anything that uses the hard drive will see a performance boost), but it will not do anything for your framerates. For gaming, the components to concentrate on, in order of performance, are the Grahpics Card, amount of RAM, and Processor type.

    Quote:9. How will Windows Vista impact my gaming performance?

    Windows Vista is known to negatively impact gaming performance. However, in the worst case scenario, you will only see a 5-10% drop in frames per second. The main reason for this drop in performance is the immature Vista drivers that ATI and Nvidia have. Given time, ATI and Nvidia will release better drivers that optimize their cards for Vista. It's important to note that a slight drop in gaming performance shouldn't be a major reason to stay away from Vista. When initially launched, Windows XP suffered from the same problem as Vista. As the months went on, and ATI and Nvidia developed more mature drivers, XP became the most stable and efficient operating system in the Microsoft lineup.

    Question 9 written by FREN. Thanks!

    Quote:What is the difference between DDR2 and GDDR3 graphics memory?

    This is a very confusing topic for those not computer-savvy. GDDR3 is the newer memory and it is built on a smaller process. It consumes less power, produces less heat as a result, and can have much higher clocks than DDR2. There can be substantial performance differences between cards with both memory types.

    I will be adding more questions to the FAQ - feel free to post suggestions in this thread.

    Conclusion:
    Overall, I hoped this guide has helped clear up some common and more advanced questions regarding 3D graphics in a notebook. Please make sure any questions you ask here in the Gaming/Graphics forum aren't already answered in this guide. Feel free to post specific questions in this thread by replying to it.

    Useful Links:
    ATI Mobile Cards
    Nvidia Mobile Cards
    Dreamer's Notebook GPU Guide

    Thank you for reading."
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Espero que vos ajude.

    cumps
     
    Última edição: 8 de Dezembro de 2007
  2. starcraft2

    starcraft2 Power Member

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